Utah Clean Energy - Displaying items by tag: legislative and utility

Just four more days left in this year’s 2019 Legislative Session and a lot of energy and air quality issues remain in the balance. Utah Clean Energy will be working in support of legislation providing communities with a pathway to move to 100% net renewable energy and looking to see the final decisions the Legislature makes on appropriations, especially potential new funding for low-income energy efficiency programs, energy storage grants, and air quality investments.

We also had a great time with many of our Clean Energy Business Coalition members at this year’s “Clean Energy Business Day” held at the Capitol last Wednesday, March 6! Special thanks to First Solar for sponsoring and for all the great businesses that joined. Last but not least, take a look at Utah Clean Energy’s Legislative Tracker for a complete list of all the bills that we are monitoring.

Community Renewable Energy Act Passes Out of Committee, But Prospects Uncertain in the House

HB 411-Community Renewable Energy Act (Rep. Steve Handy), would allow Utah communities that are Rocky Mountain Power customers to create a program that would provide 100% net renewable energy supplies for all of their residents and businesses by 2030. The bill passed out of the House Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee last Thursday by a vote of 7-4. This came after the Committee had voted to hold the bill the day before. While the majority of Committee members supported the bill, many objected to the idea that customers in participating communities would have to “opt out” of the program, in spite of provisions providing for significant public processes and allow for any customer to opt out.

Status: HB 411 now awaits a vote in the full House of Representatives, likely Monday (3/11). If it passes there, it would still need a vote in the full Senate.

Energy Efficiency and Air Quality Programs Funding May Not Be Resolved Until Special Session Later This Year

Utah Clean Energy has supported a number of bills that would improve air quality and advance clean energy that are awaiting final word on funding. The Executive Appropriations Committee is in charge of finalizing the FY2020 budget and appropriations requests, such as the one Utah Clean Energy has supported to expand state funding for the Weatherization Assistance Program. However, news outlets are now reporting that the Utah Legislature may postpone final decisions on appropriations requests until it passes a tax reform bill, likely in a special session later this year. We will await final word on appropriations later this week.

Status: The Executive Appropriations Committee is now set to meet March 12, to conclude the appropriations process for this session.

The latest on other energy bills we’re following

HB 407-Renewable Energy Facilities Amendments (Rep. Joel Briscoe) would modify “Schedule 32” rates for large energy users that seek to contract for new renewable energy resources. The bill was heard in the House Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee last Monday (3/4) and Utah Clean Energy testified in favor of the bill with the sponsor, along with a representative from eBay. HB 407 was held for further study in interim committee.

HB 304-Fossil Fuel Tax Amendments (Rep. Joel Briscoe) would create a tax on emissions from fossil fuels created by Utah facilities, such as power plants, refineries, cement making facilities, and others. HB 304 would refund most of the revenues generated by the new tax through a reduction in other taxes. HB 304 received a hearing in the House Revenue and Taxation Committee on Friday, March 8, though the bill did not move forward out of committee.

HB 307-Utility Online Usage Data Amendments (Rep. Eric Hutchings) would allow nonresidential electricity customers of Rocky Mountain Power and rural electricity cooperatives access to more granular data on their energy use through an online portal. The bill is awaiting a final vote in the Senate after passing out of the Senate Transportation, Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee.

SB 150-Energy Balancing Account Amendments (Senator Daniel Hemmert) would allow Rocky Mountain Power to retain 100% of the balance of funds in its Energy Balancing Account, which the utility uses to pay for its power costs. SB 150 passed out of the House Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee and now awaits a final vote in the House to pass.

 

Tick Tock! Things are picking up steam as we head into the last two weeks of the session. A major bill we’ve been following on building energy codes advanced this week, while legislation to help communities move to 100% net renewable energy has been released and a lively discussion is expected next week.

As always, check out Utah Clean Energy’s Legislative Tracker for a list of all the bills that we are monitoring.

Building Codes and Energy Efficiency Training Bills Finalized

Bills relating to energy efficiency standards for new buildings wrapped up last week. HB 218-Construction Code Modifications (Rep. Mike Schultz), which updates the statewide building code, has significant implications for energy efficiency in new buildings. While HB 218 did not go as far as we would have liked to advance energy efficiency in new residential buildings, we commented in support of the bill as it does adopt the full 2018 commercial energy code. Utah is now one of only a handful of states to have adopted this energy code. Representative Shultz sponsored an improvement to add one hour of energy conservation training for building contractors in a related bill, HB 187-Professional Licensing Amendments, which deals with professional licensing for contractors.

Status: Both HB 218 and HB 187 got approval from the Senate and now await a signature by Governor Herbert.

Bill to Expand Renewable Energy Options for Utah Communities Released

Legislation aiming to help Utah communities expand their renewable energy supplies is expected to go to committee for hearings this week. Utah Clean Energy supports HB 411-Community Renewable Energy Act (Rep. Steve Handy) which would allow Utah communities that are Rocky Mountain Power customers to create a program that would provide 100% net renewable energy supplies for all of their residents and businesses by 2030. As we shared previously, Salt Lake City, Park City, Moab, Summit County, and Cottonwood Heights have passed resolutions endorsing a move to 100% renewable electricity resources. HB 411 would create a rulemaking process before the Public Service Commission to identify the details of how this program would be created and administered. HB 411 has stringent provisions preventing costs resulting from this program to be shifted to non-participating customers.

Bill Helping Large Energy Users Access Renewable Energy to be Heard This Week

HB 407-Renewable Energy Facilities Amendments (Rep. Joel Briscoe), would modify “Schedule 32” rates for large energy users that seek to contract for new renewable energy resources. The current rate design makes it difficult for Schedule 32 customers to get credit for the capacity contributions of variable renewable energy resources. HB 407 would provide a capacity credit for new Schedule 32 projects.

Status: HB 407 1st Substitute will be heard by the House Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee on Monday at 4pm. HB 411 will likely be heard theis week by the same House committee, though a hearing time is yet to be determined.

Vehicle Emissions Bills Move Forward but Air Quality Funding Remains Uncertain

A number of air quality bills that Utah Clean Energy supports advanced through The House Natural Resources, Environment, and Agriculture Committee last week, including HB 295-Vehicle Emissions Reduction Program (Rep. Jeff Stenquist) and Representative Briscoe’s proposal to expand free public transit days, HB 353-Reduction in Single Occupancy Vehicle Trips Pilot Program. SB 111- The Energy Storage Innovation, Research, and Grant Program Act (Senator Lincoln Fillmore) would create a $6.5 million grant program to help encourage adoption of residential and commercial energy storage systems also moved forward this week out of the House Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee.

However, with state tax revenues down by $200 million, total funding available for air quality and clean energy measures remains uncertain. SB 111, for example, is still in the House Rules Committee this week. Air quality funding will likely remain undetermined until the Executive Appropriations Committee wraps up its deliberations on Friday, March 8.

The latest on other utility bills we’re following

HB 107-Sustainable Transportation & Energy Plan Amendments (Rep. Steve Handy) would authorize Dominion Energy to create and charge their customers for new gas programs under the Sustainable Transportation and Energy Plan (STEP) act, including renewable and natural gas vehicle infrastructure, commercial line extensions, and other technologies. The bill has passed the House and the Senate Transportation, Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee and now awaits a final vote in the Senate.

HB 307-Utility Online Usage Data Amendments (Rep. Eric Hutchings) would allow nonresidential electricity customers of Rocky Mountain Power and rural electricity cooperatives access to more granular data on their energy use through an online portal. HB 307 has now passed the full House (70-0-5) and now goes over to the Senate for further consideration.

SB 150-Energy Balancing Account Amendments (Senator Daniel Hemmert) would allow Rocky Mountain Power to retain 100% of the balance of funds in its Energy Balancing Account, which the utility uses to pay for its power costs. SB 150 was approved by the Senate Transportation, Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee this week and now needs a final vote to be approved by the House.

Buckle up for the latest from the 2019 Utah Legislative Session!  Appropriations Subcommittees are finishing up their work on FY2020 Appropriations, which means multiple air quality and energy bills are gaining momentum. So be warned that this week’s update is a bit long as we dig into proposals for energy and air quality funding. As always, check out Utah Clean Energy’s Legislative Tracker for a list of all the bills that we are following!

Update on Energy and Air Quality Appropriations

Governor Herbert kicked off an important discussion about air quality and clean energy with his proposal to spend $100 million this year on investments to improve Utah’s air quality. Legislators filed a range of appropriations requests that seek to provide funds for measures to reduce emissions from homes, businesses, state government operations, and on and off-road vehicles.

 

Utah Clean Energy is supporting the following investments:

Weatherization Assistance Program: One of Utah Clean Energy's priority bills is an effort to expand energy efficiency programs for low-income homeowners through the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). Representative Steve Handy (Layton) requested $1.5 million in ongoing funds to support WAP. The Business, Economic Development, and Labor Subcommittee chose to fund the appropriation at $500,000 as a one-time appropriation at #50 on its priority list.

Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure: Representative Lowry Snow (St. George) and Representative Val Potter (North Logan) each requested about $5 million in funding to expand private and state electric vehicle charging infrastructure. Representative Snow’s request was prioritized as #9 of 9 on the Nature Resources, Agriculture, and Environmental Appropriations Subcommittee bill list, while Representative Potter’s was included in the Infrastructure and General Government Appropriations Committee Appropriations bill.

High Emissions Vehicle Replacement Grants: This request would provide $6.5 million for grants of up $5,500 to help Utah citizens with pre-2004 high emissions vehicles with funds to replace those vehicles with newer and cleaner gas-powered cars or electric cars. This request is a companion to Representative Jeff Stenquist’s (Draper) HB 295, Vehicle Emissions Reduction Program.

Energy Storage Innovation Grants: Representative Eric Hutchings requested $1.5 million in one-time funds to support innovative energy storage projects at the discretion of the Office of Energy Development (OED). This is a companion request to SB 111, Energy Storage Research, Innovation, and Grant Program Act (Senator Lincoln Fillmore). This request was prioritized at #7 of 9 on the list air quality appropriations by the Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Appropriations Subcommittee.

Separately, the Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Appropriations Committee listed a one-time appropriation to provide $200,000 in funding for a transmission study work group as #16 on its priority list.

Status: Now that each of the Appropriations subcommittees has completed their work, the Executive Appropriations Committee will undertake the work to finalize the FY 2020 Appropriations bills. We will likely have to wait until the final week of the legislative session to see which requests will be fully funded by the Legislature.

Building Codes and Energy Efficiency Bills Move Forward

Two bills that relate to energy efficiency in buildings moved forward last week. HB 218-Construction Code Modifications (Representative Mike Schultz), which deals with the statewide building code, has significant implications for energy efficiency in new buildings. While HB 218 did not go as far as we would have liked to advance energy efficiency in new residential buildings, we commented in support of the bill as it does adopt the full 2018 commercial energy code. The sponsor, Representative Shultz, also helped add one hour of energy conservation training every two years for building contractors in a related bill, HB 187, Professional Licensing Amendments, which deals with professional licensing for contractors.  Both bills passed the full House last week and then were favorably recommended by the Senate Business and Labor Committee.

Status: Both HB 218 and HB 187, both sponsored by Representative Schultz, now go to the full Senate for consideration.

The Latest on Energy Storage and Multiple Utility Related Bills

SB 111- The Energy Storage Innovation, Research, and Grant Program Act (Senator Lincoln Fillmore, South Jordan), would create a $6.5 million grant program to help encourage adoption of residential and commercial energy storage systems. The bill passed the full Senate 26-0-03 and just passed out of the House Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee on Monday, February 25 on a 7-2-2 vote.

HB 107-Sustainable Transportation & Energy Plan Amendments (Representative Steve Handy) would authorize Dominion Energy to create and charge their customers for new gas programs under the Sustainable Transportation and Energy Plan (STEP) act, including renewable and natural gas vehicle infrastructure, commercial line extensions, and other technologies. The bill passed the full House 70-0-5 and now moves over to the Senate.

HB 307-Utility Online Usage Data Amendments (Rep. Eric Hutchings, Kearns) would allow nonresidential electricity customers of Rocky Mountain Power and rural electricity cooperatives access to more granular data on their energy use through an online portal. That bill passed out of the House Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee and will now go before the full House.

SB 150-Energy Balancing Account Amendments (Senator Daniel Hemmert, Orem) would allow Rocky Mountain Power to retain 100% of the balance of funds in its Energy Balancing Account, which the utility uses to pay for its power costs. SB 150 was approved by the Senate Transportation, Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee.

New Bills

HB 407-Renewable Energy Facilities Amendments (Representative Joel Briscoe, Salt Lake City): This bill would change the way that electricity customers that seek to contract for renewable energy supplies under “Schedule 32” can receive credit for the capacity value of the new energy supplies to the grid at times of peak demand.

That’s a wrap. The final votes were cast last week, and the 2019 Utah Legislative Session closed. Utah Clean Energy’s policy team was there, lobbying till the end for some last minute wins! We'll be sending a more detailed update next week, but here’s a quick rundown on some key clean energy and air quality bills that passed and await a final decision from the Governor.

Local Governments Take Step to Get to 100% Net Renewable Energy

HB 411-Community Renewable Energy Act passed the Senate in the last hours of the legislative session by a vote of 23-6. This was an important step forward for renewable energy in Utah! HB 411 creates a pathway for communities served by Rocky Mountain Power to move to 100% net renewable energy. Should Governor Herbert sign the legislation, the action will shift to the Utah Public Service Commission, which will be charged with how to structure the Community Renewable Energy program.

Some Wins and Losses for Air Quality and Clean Energy Funding in the State Budget

The House and Senate came to a deal on the 2019 state budget. The budget (outlined in SB 2 and SB 3) includes about $28 million in funding for air quality programs. Of that amount, $1 million is allocated for the Weatherization Assistance Program, and $7 million for electric vehicle charging infrastructure at business, government, and state agency locations. The budget also includes $250,000 to fund a study on electric transmission challenges, in an effort to address the bottleneck of large-scale, renewable energy projects that are stuck in transmission limbo. Last, but far from least, is $200,000 for a study by the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute on air quality and climate.

Unfortunately, a few items that we supported did not make the cut. SB 111-Energy Storage Innovation, Research, and Grant Program that would have provided grants for residential and commercial energy storage did not receive any funding and did not pass. The same was true for HB 295-Vehicle Emissions Reduction Program that would have provided assistance to replace older high emissions vehicles.

Better Building Energy Codes Equals Cleaner Air

As reported earlier, HB 218-Construction Code Modifications (Rep. Mike Schultz) passed earlier in the session and included the adoption of the full 2018 commercial energy code, making Utah just one of a handful of states to adopt this code. The updated building code will reduce energy waste in new buildings, thereby reducing pollution. Unfortunately, the bill also modified energy efficiency standards for residential buildings by making future rules for air tightness less stringent.

Renewable Energy Options for Large Energy Users

Utah Clean Energy helped with legislation, HB 407-Renewable Energy Facilities Amendments (Rep Joel Briscoe), which would help large energy users such as data centers, get more renewable energy to power their facilities. This bill did not pass the House Public Utilities, Energy, and Technology Committee last week, but did get referred to interim session for further study. We look forward to productive discussions on this during the interim session.

A couple more energy bills that passed in the last days of the session

SB 150-Energy Balancing Account Amendments (Sen. Daniel Hemmert): This bill codifies that Rocky Mountain Power can recover 100% of the funds in its Energy Balancing Account (EBA). We opposed this bill because it shifts risks from RMP's energy resource planning decisions away from the utility and towards customers.

HB 307-Utility Online Usage Data Amendments (Rep. Eric Hutchings): This bill requires Rocky Mountain Power and rural electricity cooperatives to provide access to nonresidential customers to the customer’s energy usage data in 15-minute intervals (or the shortest interval available through its existing electric meter)

 
Wednesday, 06 February 2019 08:12

Week One of the 2019 Utah Legislative Session

New Opportunities for Energy Storage Systems

Senator Lincoln Fillmore (District 10, South Jordan) has sponsored legislation to help advance residential and commercial energy storage systems. SB 111, the Energy Storage Innovation, Research, and Grant Program Act, would create a $5 million grant program to help encourage adoption of energy storage systems. The grants would cover up to 20% of project costs, with up to $7,500 available for residential energy storage systems and up to $50,000 available for commercial energy storage systems.

Status: Kate Bowman, Utah Clean Energy’s Renewable Energy Program Manager, testified in favor of SB 111 at the hearing before the Senate Transportation, Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee on Monday, February 4, 2019, speaking to the resiliency and grid benefits of distributed energy storage technologies. The Senate Committee voted 5-2-1 to advance SB 111 to the Senate floor.

Resolution Supporting Rural Renewable Energy Development Moves Forward

Rep. Patrice Arent (District 36, Millcreek) has offered a resolution, House Concurrent Resolution (HCR) 2, Concurrent Resolution Supporting Renewable and Sustainable Energy Options to Promote Rural Economic Development, which supports the development of solar, wind, geothermal, hydrogen and small conduit hydroelectric energy resources in rural Utah for the economic benefits that such projects can provide. The resolution has received support from a broad range of stakeholders, including rural Utah communities, clean energy advocates and developers, and others.

Status: The House of Representatives passed out HCR 1st Substitute by a vote of 72-1-2 last week. The resolution goes before the Senate Transportation, Public Utilities, Energy and Technology Committee on Wednesday, February 6, 2019.

Expanding Energy Efficiency Programs for Low-Income Households

Utah Clean Energy is supporting an effort to expand energy efficiency programs for low-income homeowners through the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). Representative Steve Handy (District 16, Layton) is sponsoring a request for appropriation (RFA) to provide $1.5 million in state funding for WAP programs. This proven program saves participating households an average of 35 percent on their energy bills, critically important for homeowners whose energy burden is often as high as 14% of their income (see an infographic here). Currently the state provides no funding to this program, with the vast majority of funding coming from the federal government. The additional funds would allow the program to reach about 120 more households each year.

Status: This request will be heard before the Business, Economic Development, and Labor Appropriations Subcommittee on Wednesday, February 6.

Other Bills We’re Watching

Monday, 28 January 2019 16:07

2019 Legislative Session Tracking

Utah Clean Energy is tracking a variety of clean energy issues this session, all detailed below.  For a roundup of our legislative priorities, click here.

Energía limpia de Utah y el Departamento de sostenibilidad de Salt Lake City están orgullosos de anunciar Empoderar a SLC, un esfuerzo de participación comunitaria para empoderar a los residentes de Salt Lake City con las herramientas para ahorrar energía y dinero para reducir la contaminación de toda la comunidad.  Con Empoderar a SLC, estamos trabajando con los propietarios, inquilinos, pequeños negocios, escuelas y programas de la comunidad, traer eficiencia energética a las masas! 

Empiece hoy

Ahorrar energía es algo que todo el mundo puede hacer. ¡Descargue la lista de verificación en inglés o español  para comenzar a ahorrar energía en su hogar!Spanish Full Home Energy Checklist

Sin embargo, la realidad es que no todo el mundo puede acceder a herramientas simples de eficiencia energética. Cosas como el costo inicial, limitada promoción de incentivos o barreras lingüísticas que sea difícil para algunas familias a implementar mejoras de eficiencia de energía. Empoderar a SLC es destinada a abordar esos problemas concentrándose en llevar herramientas de ahorro de energía, educación, y recursos directamente al los códigos ZIP de 84104 84116. Estos barrios fueron elegidos para impulsar históricamente más bajos de participación en programas de eficiencia energética y las estrategias piloto que podrían ampliarse a otras zonas de la ciudad.

Conoce a los embajadores de energía

Un beneficio de trabajar dentro de un área específico es que los residentes y organizaciones ya en estas comunidades pueden tomar la iniciativa!  Los "Embajadores de la energía" de Empoderar SLC ayudara nuestros esfuerzos comunitarios para ofrecer educación y recursos de ahorro de energía a los residentes de 84116 y 84104.

  • Comité de rescate internacional: Ayuda a los refugiados sobrevivir, recuperarse y ganar el control de su futuro, el IRC se LED directa-instalaciones completas durante las visitas domiciliarias con familias reasentadas.
  • Condado de Salt Lake servicios de adulto y envejecimiento: comidas en voluntarios de las ruedas de lado del oeste de Salt Lake City le dará mayores enfermos recibir comidas una opción para instalaciones de LED gratis en su casa.
  • División de la juventud y la familia Salt Lake City: Esta organización pone dos eventos cada año centrado en la calidad del aire, salud y medio ambiente. En estos eventos, los asistentes podrán recibir duchas de ahorro de agua que a su vez también reducirá la demanda de energía y los costos de calefacción de agua.

Iluminarlo con LED

bulbs april 7

Si usted vive en el código postal 84116 o 84104 y no ha cambiado su viejo luces incandescentes por LED de ahorro de energía. Ahora es el momento! Visita cualquiera de los dos lugares siguientes:

  • Centro de unidad Sorenson (1383 S 900 W, SLC, 84104): los residentes del área pueden traer hasta 15 bombillas ineficientes para intercambiar en la recepción durante las horas de libre: el lunes a jueves 9:00 – 9:00; viernes 9:00 – 8:00; sábado 9:00 – 5:00.
  • Crossroads Westside despensa de alimentos: los residentes pueden traer luz ineficiente hasta 15 bombillas para intercambiar durante el horario de la despensa: el lunes, el martes, el jueves 9:00 – 5:00
  • Utah comunidad acción: residentes que están aplacando por asistencia con la programa de HEAT tendrán la oportunidad de intercambiar hasta 15 bombillas durante su cita.

Obtenga más información y participe comunicándose con Shelby Stults, Coordinadora del Programa Comunitario de Energía Limpia de Utah.

GRACIAS A ESTOS APOYOS POR HACER POSIBLE ESTE PROGRAMA

  Fundado por                                                       Con apoyo adicional de:                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
SLCgreen Simple City Seal Logo Square transparent                                                     

                    Drake Real Estate
                   
 

               RMP plain.185 Copy            

  ucair
Tuesday, 08 January 2019 15:08

Utah Clean Energy's Legislative Priorities

The 2019 Utah Legislative Session kicks off on January 28! Utah policymakers are set to engage in a number of important discussions about air quality, renewable energy, Rocky Mountain Power’s coal fleet, and new opportunities to expand electric vehicles and public transportation. While things come up and change quickly throughout the session, below are Utah Clean Energy’s top priorities heading into the legislative session.

Allow Utah Cities to Move to Net 100% Renewable Energy

Salt Lake City, Park City, Summit County, and Moab have made inspiring and groundbreaking commitments to move their community energy supplies to net 100% renewable energy resources over the next decade. Each of them has agreements with Rocky Mountain Power to achieve these goals.These communities are seeking first-in-the-nation legislation that would allow them to move away from Rocky Mountain Power’s default generation mix and towards 100% renewable sources. We are supportive of this legislation and look forward to helping cities to achieve it.

Expanding Access to Low-Income Energy Efficiency Programs

Making our buildings more energy efficient remains a top priority for Utah Clean Energy, especially as we seek to ensure that Utah’s energy efficiency programs are accessible to all Utahns regardless of income level. That is why we are seeking additional state funding for Utah’s Weatherization Assistance Program. The Weatherization program offers low-income homeowners energy efficiency services such as new insulation, new energy efficient lighting, and replacing and upgrading heating equipment. This is a proven program that can help ease the energy cost burdens for Utah families while improving air quality by reducing emission from existing buildings.

Updating Utah’s Building Codes

Speaking of energy efficient buildings, building energy codes are an important way to ensure that new homes and businesses don’t waste energy. Utah Clean Energy’s Energy Efficiency Program Director, Kevin Emerson, serves as an appointed public member of the state Uniform Building Code Commission. Over the course of 2018, he worked with other members of the Commission and its advisory committees to recommend updates to Utah’s residential and commercial building codes. Included in this recommendation, which was submitted to the Utah Legislature in August 2018, is the adoption of the most current energy code for commercial buildings and several modest amendments to improve Utah’s energy code for new homes. The recommended energy code changes are low cost and would help save money and reduce air emissions. However, the Legislature must formally enact the recommended code changes for them to take effect. Utah Clean Energy is excited to work towards completing this final step and to implement these important changes to the building codes.

New Tools to Accelerate Utah’s Transition to Clean Energy

While Utah still relies heavily on coal for its electricity supply (currently around 60 percent of its electricity resource mix), that is likely to change as new solar and wind resources are increasingly cost competitive with existing coal plants. The recent analysis by Rocky Mountain Power has found that there is a potential to retire some of its coal units early and save Utah customers money on their energy bills. Accelerating the retirement of coal-fired power plants is tricky from an accounting and a political perspective. But given the significant economic and environmental benefits of doing so, Utah Clean Energy is looking for tools that can help to accelerate our transition to newer and cleaner energy resources. We look forward to working with our friends at HEAL Utah and Western Resource Advocates on legislation that would authorize a new financial mechanism to help accelerate coal retirements called “securitization.”  Securitization involves using bonds backed by electric customers to recover unpaid investments in power plants that retire early.

Fixing Commercial Solar Taxes

Recently, Utah businesses that have installed solar have run into issues with the assessment of personal property taxes on the value of the solar systems. This has the potential to hinder businesses that want to install solar by making commercial solar projects less financially beneficial. It also introduces uncertainty for Utah solar developers at a time when there is already a significant transition underway with the end of net metering in sight. We are working with the Utah Solar Energy Association and members of our Clean Energy Business Coalition to help provide for solutions to address the personal property tax issue.

Efforts to Improve Air Quality & Reduce Carbon Pollution

Governor Herbert’s FY2020 budget proposal includes $100 million to improve air quality, a potentially major increase in funds to improve air quality and reduce emissions. This is an opportunity to find ways to reduce air pollution and carbon emissions, including new solutions to promote electric vehicles and charging infrastructure, reduce emissions from existing buildings, expand mass transit and create win-wins for Utah’s air and address the risks of climate change. We look forward to working with state legislators and our partners to seize this opportunity to its fullest.

Stay engaged during the 2019 Legislative Session by signing up for our take action email list.

 
 
 
 
 
 

En Espanol 2016 Button e1456775397319Utah Clean Energy and Salt Lake City Sustainability Department are proud to bring you Empower SLC, a community engagement effort to empower Salt Lake City residents with the tools to save energy and money while reducing pollution on a community-wide scale.  Through Empower SLC, we are working with homeowners, renters, small businesses, schools, and community programs, to bring energy efficiency to the masses!

mini checklist image

Get Started Today

Saving energy is something everyone can do! Download Empower SLC's handy home energy checklist in English or Spanish as your first step to saving energy at home!

However, the reality is that not everyone can access simple energy efficiency tools. Things like the up-front cost, limited incentive promotion or linguistic barriers make it hard for some households to implement energy efficiency upgrades. Empower SLC is aimed at addressing those challenges by focusing on bringing energy-saving tools, education, and resources directly to ZIP codes 84104 and 84116. These neighborhoods were chosen to boost historically lower rates of participation in energy efficiency programs and pilot strategies that could be scaled up to other areas of the city.

Meet the Energy Ambassadors

A benefit of working within a targeted area is that residents and organizations already in these communities can take the lead!  The Empower SLC “Energy Ambassadors” head up our community efforts to bring energy saving education and resources to residents of 84116 and 84104 communities.

  • International Rescue Committee (IRC): Helping refugees survive, recover, and gain control of their future, the IRC will complete LED direct-installations during home visits with resettled families.
  • Salt Lake County Aging & Adult Services: Meals on Wheels volunteers routed in Salt Lake City’s West Side will give homebound seniors receiving meals an option for free LED installations in their home.
  • Salt Lake City’s Division of Youth and Family: YouthCity Gov’t puts on two events every year centered on air quality, health, and the environment. At these events, attendees will be able to receive water-saving showerheads that in turn will also reduce energy demand and water-heating costs.

LED Light Up!bulbs april 7

If you live in 84116 and 84104 and haven’t switched out your old incandescent lights for energy saving LEDs, now is the time! Head over to any of Empower SLC’s permanent “Light Swaps” at:

  • Crossroads Urban Center: residents may bring up to 15 inefficient light bulbs to exchange during the pantry’s open hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM.
  • Sorenson Unity Center: residents may bring in up to 15 inefficient light bulbs to exchange at the front desk during open facility hours: Monday – Thursday 9:00 AM- 9:00 PM; Friday 9:00 AM – 8:00 PM; Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM.
  • Utah Community Action's HEAT program: residents applying for HEAT assistance will have the opportunity to exchange up to 15 light bulbs during their HEAT appointment.

Learn more and get involved by contacting Shelby Stults, Utah Clean Energy's Community Program Coordinator

We’re just getting started! Stay tuned for more information about other ways we’re working to promote energy efficiency in Salt Lake City in partnership with community organizations, local schools, utilities, small businesses, and more.

THANK YOU TO THESE SUPPORTERS FOR MAKING THIS PROGRAM POSSIBLE
                                                  

  Funded by              With additional support from:                                                                                                       
SLCgreen Simple City Seal Logo Square transparent                                                     

                    Drake Real Estate
                   
 

               RMP plain.185 Copy            

  ucair

 

 

Page 1 of 4